Ringing - 4th Jan 2016

Introduction to Ringing

Long term studies of the wild bird population includes the licensed catching and ringing of birds. This occurs throughout the world and in GB is organised and managed by the British Trust for Ornithology. A number of licensed ringers are operating within three Ringing Groups in Northamptonshire. Eleanor and I work within the Northants Ringing Group (NRG). 

Regular ringing occurs at a handful of sites with less regular activity at a variety of locations. Of the well-known birding locations within the county, probably the most active sites for ringing include Pitsford Reservoir, Stanford Reservoir, Stanwick Gravel Pits, Earls Barton Gravel Pits and Stortons Gravel Pits. Pitsford is a regular venue for us with most of the ringing occurring within the Wildlife Trust reserve. Preliminary ringing totals for Northamptonshire for 2012 and previous years can be accessed by visiting the BTO Home Page, clicking on Ringing under 'Core Surveys' and then clicking 'on-line reports'.


Common Snipe






Short-eared Owl
Jay






Maps are now available to show some of the movements of our
international recoveries.  By way of example, the following map
refers to a Fieldfare caught locally and then found in west Finland.
LC22245 Adult 07-12-2010   Heyford Hills, near Nether Heyford: 52°12'N 1°3'W (Northamptonshire)
Freshly dead 06-05-2011   Kuhmo: 64°1'N 29°51'E (Oulu) Finland 2,223km NE 0y 4m 29d 


Another example is a Blackbird found dead in our garden which had
originally been ringed in the Netherlands.  The British Isles are
clearly important wintering/passage areas for our northern thrushes.

NLA First-year Female 14-10-2010  Reddingbootpad: 53°15'N 4°57'E (Vlieland) The Netherlands
L350952 Freshly dead (predated) 29-01-2011   Hanging Houghton, Brixworth: 52°21'N 0°54'W (Northamptonshire) 406km WSW 0y 3m 15d 






Chase Park Farm ringing report 2015.

During 2015 I made 11 visits to the farm for the specific purpose of ringing, totalling 34 hours and 20 visits for the purpose of nest box checking and general recording totalling another 43 hours.
The highlight this year for me was the chance to ring a Raven that had been trapped in one of the Gamekeepers Larson traps. This was a magnificent bird and whilst I have seen Ravens before this was the first opportunity to see one close up.



During my 11 ringing visits to the farm I caught a total of 397 birds of which 193 were new adults, 148 nestlings and 56 re-traps (birds ringed during previous visits and/or years). The species caught this year were.
Species
Full grown
Pulli
Retraps
Total
Sparrowhawk
1
0
0
1
Great Spotted Woodpecker
1
0
1
2
Wren
4
0
1
5
Dunnock
10
0
1
11
Robin
9
0
3
12
Blackbird
4
0
0
4
Song Thrush
1
0
0
1
Blackcap
7
0
0
7
Chiffchaff
1
0
0
1
Willow Warbler
2
0
0
2
Goldcrest
2
0
0
2
Long-tailed Tit
13
0
0
13
Marsh Tit
3
0
1
4
Coal Tit
5
0
2
7
Blue Tit
101
77
34
212
Great Tit
19
67
13
99
Jay
1
0
0
1
Jackdaw
0
3
0
3
Raven
1
0
0
1
Chaffinch
5
0
0
5
Greenfinch
0
1
0
1
Goldfinch
1
0
0
1
Bullfinch
2
0
0
2
Chase Park Farm Total
193
148
56
397

During my 31 visits in total this year (Ringing, feeder refills and general walks) I recorded the following species.
Blackbird
Greenfinch
Red-legged Partridge
Blackcap
Grey Heron
Redwing
Blue Tit
Grey Partridge
Reed Bunting
Bullfinch
Grey Wagtail
Robin
Buzzard
House Martin
Rook
Canada Goose
House Sparrow
Skylark
Carrion Crow
Jackdaw
Song Thrush
Chaffinch
Jay
Sparrowhawk
Chiffchaff
Kestrel
Starling
Coal Tit
Lapwing
Stock Dove
Collared Dove
Little Owl
Swallow
Cuckoo
Long-tailed Tit
Tawny Owl
Dunnock
Magpie
Teal
Fieldfare
Mallard
Whitethroat
Goldcrest
Marsh Tit
Willow Warbler
Golden Plover
Moorhen
Woodpigeon
Goldfinch
Pheasant
Wren
Great Spotted Woodpecker
Pied/White Wagtail
Yellowhammer
Great Tit
Raven
Green Woodpecker
Red Kite

There are now 28 Blue/Great Tit, 4 Barn Owl, 2 Tawny Owl, 2 Little Owl, 2 Kestrel and 5 Treecreeper nest boxes that I monitor around the farm plus the nest boxes that Mrs Armstrong has in her garden. Again none of the Tawny Owl or Kestrel boxes were used but one of the Barn Owl boxes had a roosting bird and evidence, in the form of multiple pellets that the box is used on a frequent basis.
The two Woodpecker boxes were not used by Woodpeckers but one was used by a Great Tit who must have spent ages gathering all the moss that lined the box. The new design of Treecreeper box were not used by the target species but two were used by Blue Tits with the nest and brood crammed into the small internal space. One Little Owl box was used by a Jackdaw and the other has yet to be used although Little Owls have been seen in the vicinity.


Nick Wood.
Northants Ringing Group.       

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